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Kratom Extraction Recipe for Kratom Incense or Kratom Resin*

1. Grind 28 gm of leaf to a powder and put into a pot filled with 1 liter of water.
2. Gently boil, stirring often.
3. When about liter is left, strain the leaves out, and place the liquid aside.
4. Add a fresh 1 liter of water, add the leaves back, and gently boil again.
5. When liter is left, strain the leaves out and place the other liquid with this liquid.
6. Discard the leaves/leaf powder.
7. Combine the 2 volumes of water/extract/liquid and gently boil down.

To make tea:

Boil the liquid down to about 100ml and cool. Traditionally, it was drank as a single serving (very strong), or as 2-4 separate servings for milder effects.

To make tarry resin extract:

Reduce down to a tarry mixture, mix with powdered Chai tea mix and fresh, crushed ginger (or whatever was desired) and then chill. Use all at once for very strong effects, or split into 2-4 separate servings for milder effects.

To make as a smoking admixture:

Sometimes the water/extract mixture was reduced to a resin, dried as completely as possible, mixed with finely powdered leaf, and used for burning, but reports are only somewhat reliable.

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* We offer this only as an educational reference; we do not advise, endorse, or recommend doing anything mentioned in this text. The product that is attached to this sheet is also not for ingestion in any way, whether intentional or accidental.

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Over 25 alkaloids have been isolated from kratom. The most abundant alkaloids consist of three indoles and two oxindoles which can be extracted fromthe leaves in water and made into a crude resin. The three indoles are mitragynine, paynanthine, and speciogynine - the first two of which appear to be unique to this species. The two oxindoles are mitraphylline and speciofoline. Other alkaloids present include other indoles, and oxindoles such as ajmalicine, corynanthedine, mitraversine, rhychophylline, and stipulatine.

Mitragynine is the dominant alkaloid in the plant. It was first isolated in 1907 by D. Hooper, a process repeated in 1921 by E. Field who gave the alkaloid its name. Its structure was first fully determined in 1964 by D. Zacharias, R. Rosenstein and E. Jeffrey. It is structurally related to both the yohimbe alkaloids and voacangine. It is more distantly related to other tryptamine-based psychedelic drugs such as psilocybin or LSD. Chemically, mitragynine is 9-methoxy-corynantheidine. It has the molecular formula C23H30N2O4 and a molecular weight of 398.5. Physically the freebase is a white, amorphous powder with a melting point of 102-106 degrees and a boiling point of 230-240 degrees. It is soluble in alcohol, chloroform and acetic acid. The hydrochloride salt has a melting point of 243 degrees.

The alkaloid content of the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa is about 0.5%, about half of which is mitragynine. An average leaf weighs about 1.7 grams fresh or 0.43 grams dried. Twenty leaves contain approximately 17mg of mitragynine. All leaves appear to contain mitragynine, speciogynine, paynanthine, and small quantities of speciociliatine. Oxindole alkaloids usually occur only in small or trace ammounts.

Alkaloid content varies from place to place and at different times. Within each location, there is a quantitative variation in alkaloid content from month to month. While indole content seems to be fairly stable, oxindole content shows tremendous variation.

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Kratom is traditionally only used in Thailand, although some use in Malaysia has been reported. Besides kratom (or krathom), it also goes by the names ithang, kakuam, and in southern regions, thom. Use dates far enough back that its beginning can't be determined. In addition to being used as an herbal resin in its own right, it is often used as a substitute for other herbs when they're not available.

Users distinguish different types of kratom, two main kinds being distinguished by the color of veins in the leaf - red or green/white. The green-veined variety is supposed to be better for incense. One study which surveyed Thai kratom users found that most users preferred a mixture of both, followed by red-veined alone and then white-veined alone. Growers in Australia report that both red and white veining occurs at different times in different plants which were all cloned from the same mother plant. They have not yet undertaken comparisons between the two.

The Thai government passed the Kratom Act 2486 which went into effect on August 3, 1943. This law makes planting the tree illegal and requires existing trees to be cut down. This law was not found effective, since the tree is indigenous to the country. Today, kratom is classed in the same enforcement group as cocaine and heroin by Thai law, and has the same penalties. One ounce of extract is punishable by death. As with prohibition laws elsewhere in the world, this has succeeded only at increasing black market prices. A related species, Mitragyna javanica, is often used as a substitute to get around the law, but it is not as popular. The dominant alkaloid in this species is mitrajavine, which has not yet been pharmacologically tested.

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In conclusion, there seems to be much more research done into this plant and its active constituents. Although kratom has been used since time immemorial by Thai natives, Western science hasn't paid it that much attention. What research does exist contains some apparent conflicts. Knowledge even of the plant's existence outside of Thailand has been limited to ethnobotanists and a handful of pharmacology researchers. Availability of live plants and dried leaves has been practically non-existent until very recently.

There is much to learn. - Murple

† The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The information contained in this website is intended for education, entertainment and information purposes only. This information is not intended to be used to diagnose, prescribe or replace proper medical care. The plant described herein is not intended to treat, cure, diagnose, mitigate or prevent any disease. Please refer to our Conditions of Use for using this plant database file and web site.

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